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  #1  
Old 10th December 2017, 02:56 PM
Brian Noldt Brian Noldt is offline
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Default Air New Zealand 787 Engine Failures

Air New Zealand have grounded, according to this news report, 4 of its 787 fleet due to Rolls Royce engine problems. They are wearing out sooner than expected. This last week on two consecutive days two of their aircraft had to return to the airport with engine problems. Other international airlines are also having problems with these engines and are cancelling flights.

Story and a video here:

http://www.independent.co.uk/travel/...-a8099201.html

Story and pictures here:

https://www.newsroom.co.nz/2017/12/0...ged-787-engine
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  #2  
Old 16th April 2018, 03:05 PM
MarkR MarkR is offline
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Updated info indicating more issues for fleet management for Air NZ

Stock exchange listings: New Zealand (NZX: AIR) / A
ustralia (ASX: AIZ)
MARKET ANNOUNCEMENT
Air New Zealand postal address: Private Bag 92007,
Auckland, 1142, New Zealand
Investor Relations email:
investor@airnz.co.nz
Investor website: www.airnewzealand.co.nz/investor
16 April 2018
Update:
Air New Zealand statement on global Rolls-Royce engine issue

Air New Zealand is working closely with engine manufacturer Rolls-Royce on a global issue involving some of the Trent 1000 engines that power its Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner fleet.
Last month Rolls-Royce, in conjunction with European regulator EASA, issued a directive requiring operators of a type of Trent 1000 engine
known as ‘Package C’ to carry out earlier than usual maintenance checks on a specific part of the engine compressor.

This check was already required prior to the engine reaching a flying threshold of 2,000 cycles (one way journeys). The directive reduces that timeframe to 300 cycles. Rolls-Royce advises 380 engines globally are impacted by the directive, inc luding nine in the Air New Zealand 787 fleet.
Trent 1000 Package C engines that have operated fewer than 300 cycles are unaffected by this directive. Air New Zealand also has Trent 1000 TEN
model engines in its 787 fleet and these are unaffected.


Air New Zealand expects there will be some customer and operational impact to its international schedule as a result of the checks. However, the airline does not expect this global issue involving some of the Trent 1000 engines that power its Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner fleet to
materially impact FY18 earnings and previous guidance remains unchanged.
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  #3  
Old 16th April 2018, 08:21 PM
Greg Hyde Greg Hyde is offline
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From AA

Quote:
Boeing 787-9 Trent 1000 Package C engines face further inspections

Boeing 787 operators with Rolls-Royce Trent 1000 Package C engines face potential further disruptions to their flight schedules after the engine maker announced the need for further checks due to issues with the powerplant’s turbine blades.

Rolls-Royce said in a statement on April 13 the decision to carry out addition inspections, in addition to those previously planned when the problem first emerged 2016 and again in 2017, was as part of its “ongoing inspection and testing of those engines”.

“The increased inspection frequency is driven by our further understanding of the durability of the Trent 1000 Package C compressor, a condition that we highlighted earlier this year,” Rolls-Royce said.

“These inspections will be supported by service management and flight operations guidance to airlines to be issued by the airworthiness authorities.

“This will unfortunately lead to additional disruption for our customers.”
Full story

http://australianaviation.com.au/201...r-inspections/
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  #4  
Old 17th April 2018, 04:26 PM
Greg Hyde Greg Hyde is offline
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From AA

Quote:
FAA curtails Trent-powered 787 ETOPS flights over blade failure concerns

Boeing 787 aircraft with Rolls-Royce Trent 1000 engines will have their extended operations (ETOPS) limits reduced due to issues with the powerplant’s turbine blades after a ruling from the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

The airworthiness directive (AD) published on the United States’ Federal Registry on Monday (US time) said affected aircraft would be allowed to fly no further than 140 minutes from an alternate airport.

Previously, the US FAA had allowed 330-minute ETOPS approval for the 787, which meant the aircraft could be flown on a route that kept it within five and a half hours flying time on a single engine from an alternate airport in the event of an engine failure.

“This AD was prompted by a report from the engine manufacturer indicating that after an engine failure, prolonged operation at high thrust settings on the remaining engine during an ETOPS diversion may result in failure of the remaining engine before the diversion can be safely completed,” the FAA’s AD said.

“We are issuing this AD to address the unsafe condition on these products.”

Rolls-Royce Trent 1000 ‘Package C’ engines, of which about 380 are in service powering Boeing 787-9s, including with Air New Zealand, All Nippon Airways and British Airways, have been experiencing earlier than expected turbine blade wear.

Airlines have already been forced to park aircraft while waiting for their Trent 1000 Package C engines to be inspected, repaired and/or replaced amid a shortage of replacement engines.

The US FAA AD said: “Boeing reported to the FAA that the engine manufacturer recently determined that intermediate pressure compressor (IPC) stage 2 blades have a resonant frequency that is excited by the airflow conditions existing in the engine during operation at high thrust settings under certain temperature and altitude conditions.”

“The resultant blade vibration can result in cumulative fatigue damage that can cause blade failure and consequent engine shutdown.

“In the event of a single engine in-flight shutdown during the cruise phase of flight, thrust on the remaining engine is normally increased to maximum continuous thrust (MCT).

“During a diversion following a single engine shutdown under an ETOPS flight, the remaining engine may operate at MCT for a prolonged period, under which the IPC stage 2 blades would be exposed to the resonant frequency condition.

“Therefore, an ETOPS diversion will put the remaining engine at an operating condition that would significantly increase the likelihood of failure of the remaining engine.

“In addition, if the remaining engine already had cracked IPC stage 2 blades, the likelihood of the remaining engine failing will further increase before a diversion can be safely completed.”

The US FAA’s ruling followed the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) calling for more regular checks on the intermediate pressure compressor rotor blades.

“This condition, if not detected and corrected, could lead to inflight blade release, possibly resulting in reduced control of the aeroplane,” the EASA AD published on April 13 said.
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Old 18th April 2018, 08:10 AM
Kent Broadhead Kent Broadhead is offline
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This could have a big impact on some airlines and some routes - LATAM, AirNZ.

An expensive failure by RR.
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  #6  
Old 19th April 2018, 06:41 AM
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Martin Buzzell Martin Buzzell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Broadhead View Post
This could have a big impact on some airlines and some routes - LATAM, AirNZ.

An expensive failure by RR.
Yet again after the A380 issues.
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Old 19th April 2018, 10:42 AM
Kent Broadhead Kent Broadhead is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Buzzell View Post
Yet again after the A380 issues.
So much for German engineering expertise
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Old 21st April 2018, 04:48 PM
Greg Hyde Greg Hyde is offline
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Air New Zealand suspends flying two 787s for engine repairs

Air New Zealand says it will have to remove two Boeing 787-9s from service for as long as “a number of months” while their Rolls-Royce Trent engines undergo repairs.

The Auckland-based Kiwi flag carrier says it has now completed checks on the Trent 1000 ‘Package C’ engines in its fleet following a European Aviation Safety Authority (EASA) directive issued earlier this week that called for inspections of the engine’s compressors.

“As a result of the checks two Air New Zealand 787-9 Dreamliner aircraft will be temporarily removed from service while engines undergo maintenance work at a Rolls-Royce facility in Singapore,” the airline said in a statement on Saturday morning.

“Around 340 engines globally are subject to the checks and this is placing very high demand on Rolls-Royce’s maintenance facility, meaning it may take a number of months before Air New Zealand’s engine repair work can be completed.”

Air New Zealand says it will have make changes to flight times and operating aircraft on certain routes “in order to avoid further flight cancellations to the extent that is possible”.

“Unfortunately this will mean disruption for our customers in the coming months as we adjust our schedule and fleet utilisation to accommodate these challenges and we thank our customers for their patience as we work through this,” Air New Zealand chief operational integrity and standards officer David Morgan said.

The airline said it was considering once again wet-leasing aircraft from Portuguese operator Hi Fly for service entry next month.

Full Story and statement from RR

http://australianaviation.com.au/201...ngine-repairs/
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