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  #21  
Old 30th March 2019, 10:27 AM
Rowan McKeever Rowan McKeever is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Philip Argy View Post
Surely the old tower, or a mobile facility, should be available in an emergency for any CAT III airport. Is there no requirement under CAT III for a backup plan?
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Originally Posted by David C View Post
I’m not sure whether there is a requirement for a back up , but surely in this day and age , a “ commonsense approach “ should prevail . There should be contingency plans , but at the age I am having seen lots of water flowing under the bridge sadly nothing surprises me any more .

CAT III what exactly? CAT III ILS?

I don’t know what else you’d want to see done here? Departing aircraft were held in position on the ground, an en route controller was managing a reduced program of arrivals (and at that time of day the program probably didn’t need much reduction) down to finals, and the pilots then used their professional judgement from there. Flights with insufficient fuel or other reasons not to remain in the arrivals program took themselves out of the equation by diverting elsewhere. This all seems quite commonsense to me.

I’ve no doubt whatsoever that at a different time of day, or if the situation had gone on very much longer, or in different weather conditions, other arrangements would’ve been made. But I’ve also complete confidence in the arrangements that were made in the circumstances.
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  #22  
Old 30th March 2019, 11:36 AM
MarkR MarkR is offline
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Originally Posted by Nigel C View Post
Stop bars can be turned off in short time and a Notam put out to reflect the change with immediate effect.
I understand the old Tower is still equipped with radios (not sure how many frequencies they can handle at once..), but not much else. Capacity would obviously be reduced without all the fandangled equipment and electronic aids that the new tower has. Rwy 16L/34R would probably be taken out of action.
Both towers were remotely linked to radio equipment, they are not in situ. And the old tower would not be linked to the traffic management system, for handoffs and coordination, so they may as well stood in the car park with a handheld. The lack of handoff ability would explain why departures were stopped.

Last edited by MarkR; 30th March 2019 at 11:46 AM.
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  #23  
Old 30th March 2019, 11:43 AM
MarkR MarkR is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rowan McKeever View Post
an en route controller was managing a reduced program of arrivals
“Director” is not an en route controller but one that looks after control zone airspace, ie a terminal control unit member located at Kyeemah.
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  #24  
Old 30th March 2019, 01:14 PM
Rowan McKeever Rowan McKeever is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkR View Post
“Director” is not an en route controller but one that looks after control zone airspace, ie a terminal control unit member located at Kyeemah.


Fair enough... I couldn’t remember if it was Director or not, and should’ve checked. My point still stands.
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  #25  
Old 1st April 2019, 09:53 AM
Todd Hendry Todd Hendry is offline
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Default CAT III????

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philip Argy View Post
Surely the old tower, or a mobile facility, should be available in an emergency for any CAT III airport. Is there no requirement under CAT III for a backup plan?
Sydney is not Cat III, but if Cat III conditions existed it would take a brave/stupid pilot to arrive without a full alternate.

There’s your back up plan.

Todd.
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  #26  
Old 1st April 2019, 02:10 PM
Nigel C Nigel C is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Todd Hendry View Post
Sydney is not Cat III, but if Cat III conditions existed it would take a brave/stupid pilot to arrive without a full alternate.

There’s your back up plan.

Todd.
There are old pilots, and there are bold pilots....
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  #27  
Old 1st April 2019, 02:17 PM
Todd Hendry Todd Hendry is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nigel C View Post
There are old pilots, and there are bold pilots....
Then there are pilots who just stay home.
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  #28  
Old 16th April 2019, 10:01 AM
MarkR MarkR is offline
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Default Interesting RAAF POV of the incident

The evacuation of Sydney Airport’s Air Traffic Control (ATC) Tower on 29 March saw a No. 37 Squadron (37SQN) C-130J Hercules crew directing civilian traffic at Australia’s busiest airport.

According to ABC News, smoke from a broken air-conditioning system saw 15 ATC staff evacuated from the Tower around 11.30am.

At that moment, the crew of a 37SQN C-130J Hercules – callsign Trojan 55 – was completing a flypast over Martin Place Cenotaph in Sydney CBD.

The flypast was part of a commemorative service for the 98th anniversary of the Air Force.

Flight Lieutenant (FLTLT) Tony Hick was the Captain of Trojan 55, and said the crew was flying back to RAAF Base Richmond when it learned Sydney Airport ATC Tower had been evacuated.

“As the aircraft approached Brooklyn Bridge (36 kilometres north of Sydney), we contacted Sydney ATC to advise them we were switching frequency to Richmond Tower,” FLTLT Hick said.

“The Controller asked us to remain on Frequency (135.1MHz) and attempt to relay a message for an All Nippon Airways flight, and the message was passed.”

“We asked the Controller if we could be of further assistance and his response was that if we could help then it would be appreciated, as there had been an incident at Sydney Tower.”

The crew flew back to Sydney, and for over an hour, Trojan 55 orbited at 5000 feet while the crew directed traffic at what is normally Australia’s busiest airport.

“At no time while we were on station were aircraft allowed to depart Sydney Airport,” FLTLT Hick said.

“Once on station we conducted a number of re-broadcast messages on ‘Sydney Terminal’ (135.1 MHz) and ‘Guard’ (121.5 MHz) for civilian traffic; both on the ground and airborne.”

“Sydney adopted a Mandatory Broadcast Zone with aircraft conducting Common Traffic Advisory Frequency arrivals.”

Flights into Sydney were delayed and diverted, and the crew of Trojan 55 directed traffic on the ground.

“Most aircraft that were inbound to Sydney were maintained on Melbourne Centre, and subsequently diverted,” FLTLT Hick said.

“Trojan 55 was responsible for assuring aircraft – such as Qantas, Singapore Airlines, China Eastern, Jetstar, Virgin Australia - on the ground requesting ‘Airways/Start Clearance’ were kept updated of the situation unfolding.”

“We also relayed taxi instructions to aircraft that had landed to ensure the runway and main taxiways were not blocked.”

FLTLT Hick said while the task was not particularly difficult, it led the crew to appreciate the variety and volume of traffic managed by ATC every day.

Once the Tower was back online shortly after 12.30pm, Trojan 55 returned to RAAF Base Richmond.

“Following recovery to Richmond I received a call from Sydney ATC – a RAAF Reservist by chance - thanking me for the crew’s efforts,” FLTLT Hick said.

“We also got positive feedback, via email, from the No. 453 Squadron Flight at RAAF Base Richmond ATC.”

FLTLT Hick, who is currently on exchange with 37SQN from the Royal Air Force, said it was the first time he’d done something this complex.

“Aircrew get asked by ATC to relay calls on frequency every day, usually because they have gone out of range, but never on this scale,” FLTLT Hick said.

“The Co-Pilot, who is fresh out of training, loved the responsibility placed on us during this task.”

“Along with the Loadmaster on board, it was great that we could provide this service for our civilian counterparts.”

https://www.airforce.gov.au/news-and...raffic-control
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  #29  
Old 16th April 2019, 02:41 PM
Nigel C Nigel C is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Todd Hendry View Post
Then there are pilots who just stay home.
Are you talking about me?

At least I visit the airport regularly!
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  #30  
Old 17th April 2019, 01:20 PM
Todd Hendry Todd Hendry is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nigel C View Post
Are you talking about me?

At least I visit the airport regularly!
Yes. I meant you Nigel.

Hahahahaha.
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